Griffith Hack Clean & Sustainable Technologies


Ocean Energy – the wave of the future? by Griffith Hack

Although solar, wind and clean coal continue to attract the majority of the attention as clean energy options for the future, wave and tidal power may also play a major part in future energy production.

A recent visit to the All Energy Conference  showed that there are at least three Australian companies developing wave technology. Namely: Biopower, Oceanlinx and CETCO, who are all developing alternative means of capturing wave or tidal energy. 

New Zealand is also at the forefront of investing in wave power, with 14 different projects considered, ranging from capturing the deep sea energy in the Cook Strait that separates Wellington from the South Island; to capturing the energy in the strong tides in one of New Zealand’s largest harbours.

Wave power has tremendous potential as base load power as it is pretty reliable and available twenty four hours a day.  However, there are also likely to be significant engineering challenges such as maintenance in some extreme environments.  The combination of economic potential and engineering challenges is leading inventors to come up with a whole range of quite different solutions.

No one solution has started to dominate yet.  From an IP viewpoint, this makes wave power perhaps more interesting than some other clean technologies, where the engineering is now starting to mature.

Another important question that developers need to consider is the breadth of the claims of their patents and their competitor’s patents.  A smart innovator might find that while their patented invention did not succeed in its own right, their patents do claim a more successful invention developed by another company.  Or vice-versa.

I for one will be watching this space with much interest in the future.

Mike Lloyd

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Australia’s Carnegie Corp Ltd buys wave power patents by Justin Blows
May 30, 2009, 5:12 pm
Filed under: News | Tags: , , ,

ceto2pumpAccording to this report, Australian company Carnegie has purchased a portfolio of patents for wave generators from Renewable Energy Holdings.

Justin Blows